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The Worst Towns & Cities for Drink Driving

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Crewe Town Hall

Topping a poll is often a good thing. However, when it comes to topping a poll for drink driving charges or under the UK Drink Driving Laws, it is probable that nobody would want to “win” that prize. However, as with every study, there have to be winners and losers, and in this case there are towns and cities that seemingly have a worse problem with drink driving, the only beneficiaries being drink driving solicitors. Here we look at the worst towns and cities for drink driving and who are the winners/losers:

In 2016, Crewe in Cheshire was named for the second year running as the worst town for drink and drug driving. Wales, dominated the list in terms of actual conviction rates, whilst, perhaps surprisingly, London boasted one of the lowest.Crewe in Cheshire was named for the second year running as the worst town for drink and drug driving. Wales, dominated the list in terms of actual conviction rates, whilst, perhaps surprisingly, London boasted one of the lowest.

CreweCrewe boasted the highest conviction rate with 1.66 convictions per 1000 tests carried out. In more pleasing news, this rate had fallen for the second year in a row, perhaps suggesting that the endless TV and police campaigns were starting to make an impact on the figures.

High on the list were the Welsh towns of Llandrindod, Newport and Swansea, Cardiff and Llandudno. The English seaside resorts of Blackpool and Plymouth also featured in the top ten.

London, especially in the NW postcode areas, did surprisingly well having only 0.53 convictions per 1000. Ilford, Luton and Bradford also fared well in the survey.

The impact of a conviction, as well as a 12-month driving ban which is none discretionary, includes a rise in premiums of around £500, and of course a criminal record, and the likelihood that your employment would suffer – think about just getting to work, and if you have a driving job, even worse!

The study highlighted that the very young driver is less likely to be convicted, with rates of only 0.28 per 1000 for 17-19 year olds, whilst older male drivers were more likely to get behind the wheel under the influence. Men came out at 1.31 per 1000 compared to women at 0.73.

Obviously, data can be used to show all manner of eventualities. There are of course lots of variables that have to be taken into account. For example, how many stops there are, the size of the Police force, the local demographic of the population, whether or not there have been any local campaigns against drink driving, or tragedies that serve as a reminder.

The statistics as they are however do demonstrate that there is a reduction in the overall prevalence and that has to be a good thing. More and more people are aware of the dangers of drink driving, both to others, and to themselves. Under UK Drink Driving Laws, the penalties are some of the harshest across Europe, and can have a profound financial effect on any individual. Not only is there the loss of licence, but there is the possibility of a fine and even imprisonment. When faced with such penalties you would always be wise to instruct a drink driving solicitor, wherever you live. But moreover, knowing that you will suffer, and potentially cause a lot more suffering, should be reason enough to avoid running the risk in the first place. 

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